Archive for June, 2008

JUNE 2008 FEATURED ARTICLE-BEST AUTO REPAIR SHOP HOUSTON-MIDTOWN AUTO SERVICE

Wednesday, June 11th, 2008

Award-Winning Shop Lives by Golden Rule

Posted 6/1/2008
By Leona Dalavai Scott

Midtown Auto Service Named ‘Best Auto Shop.’


Shop Stats

Name: Midtown Auto Service
Location: Houston, Texas
Web site: www.midtownautoservice.net
Square footage of shop: 6,000 square feet
Repairs per week: 150 cars
No. of years in business: 21 years
On his success rate with retaining technicians: “I offer my technicians two weeks of paid vacation during Christmas and New Year’s after they’ve been employed with me for a year. Also, I treat them and their spouses to dinners and lunches on random occasions. I try to let them take care of family or personal business without penalties. All of my techs have their own computers with Internet access to Alldata and Identifix. Things like that really make a person want to stay.”


Midtown Auto Service in Houston, Texas
Mikey credits his prime location for business staying strong even during tough economic times.

Mikey Yu is not your average shop owner. With a criminal justice degree from the University of Houston, he always wanted to be a cop.

But when his dad retired in 1998, Mikey thought that it would be a smart move to buy the shop from him. Within four years of taking over the shop, he expanded the facility from 2,900 square feet to 6,000 square feet. Along the way, he earned his ASE
certification to become an auto technician.

Mikey is also a state-certified inspector and his shop, Midtown Auto Service, is a state-certified emissions and repair facility. The shop is known in the community for its engine and emissions diagnostic capabilities and for solving electrical driveability issues for all makes and models.

Mikey says his shop’s strength stems from the way it treats its customers and its technicians. He conducts his business by the golden rule: “Do to others as you would have them do to you.” He believes you should treat your customers and employees the way you would want to be treated.


ASE certified master tech Richard Kline working on a 2004 Lexus ES 300 timing belt.

“And if you treat your employees as family members instead of just a number, I think that productivity increases,” Mikey says. Midtown Auto Service employs two L1 master auto techs and another master auto tech. Mikey’s wife, Sharon, handles all of the administrative work in the office while Mikey takes care of the “heart of the business,” which he sees as fielding questions and calls from customers and handling technician concerns and problems.

“Our line of work is difficult,” Mikey explains. “The customers who bring their cars and trucks to us normally know nothing about repairing their cars but have heard horror stories about other automotive service shops in the past. So, you start building a rapport with customers and listen to issues about their car. Just listen. Listening is very important. That can help break the barrier of customer distrust from the beginning.”


Master ASE Certified Tech Byung Young working on a car using his 1/2 cordless SnapOn gun.

As a result of his business philosophy, Mikey has experienced great success with Midtown Auto Service. In 2007, the shop was named the “Best Auto Shop” by Citysearch, a popular Web site that enables users to post opinions on just about anything, including recommendations for services such as auto care. In 2006, the shop was named “Best Auto Repair Shop” by the local newspaper. In addition, the shop is a AAA-approved auto repair facility and a recognized emissions repair facility.

Mikey also shares his knowledge and expertise of cars through articles in Undercar Digest and Automotive Report. He has also been featured on “Car Talk,” an entertaining radio show about automotive service issues that is broadcast on National Public Radio.


ASE L1 MASTER AUTO TECHNICIAN; Panda Lee is working on an electrical drain/short on a 2006 Jaguar S-type.

As he looks toward the future, Mikey would like to expand his shop. He is currently trying to acquire the land next to his so he can double his shop size to 12,000 square feet or more. However, real estate in his area has skyrocketed so he is proceeding on those plans with caution. Despite the downturn in the economy, Mikey says Midtown Auto Service’s business has been good as a result of its prime location between downtown and the medical districts of Houston.

As Mikey celebrates the success of Midtown Auto Service, the thing he is most proud of, he said, is the teamwork his employees exhibit in working with the motoring public. As his accolades and accomplishments show, this teamwork is paying off nicel





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    Midtown Auto service, auto mechanic Houston, car repair shop, auto air conditioning, car services, battery check, automotive, auto service and repair, automobile tires, auto service houston, midtown, downtown, medical center, Houston, TX
    More Tips
    My Automotive /Car engine has a steady miss and gets terrible fuel milage. What's wrong? Houston, Tx
    A steady miss indicates one of three things: a cylinder that isn’t firing because of an ignition problem, a cylinder that isn’t firing because it isn’t receiving fuel (multipoint fuel injected engines only), or a cylinder that has lost compression. The first step in diagnosing this kind of problem is to identify the dead cylinder. A professional mechanic can do this quickly by hooking the engine up to an ignition oscilloscope and displaying an ignition raster pattern. The dead cylinder will show a firing voltage that is significantly higher or lower than its companions depending on the nature of the problem. He might also do a "power balance" test and/or a compression test to find the dead cylinder. One way you can find a weak or dead cylinder is to momentarily disconnect each of your engine’s spark plug wires one at a time while the engine is running. When the plug wire is removed from the spark plug, there should be a big drop in idle speed and idle smoothness. When you pull a wire and there’s little or no change in idle speed or quality, you’ve found the bad cylinder. It makes no difference whether you remove each plug wire from the spark plug or the distributor (or coil pack on distributorless ignition systems). The idea is to simply disconnect each cylinder for a moment to see if it makes any difference in the way the engine runs. The one that makes no difference is the problem cylinder. CAUTION: Disconnecting spark plug wires while the engine is dangerous because you risk getting shocked. You can minimize this danger one of several ways. One is to wear rubber gloves and use insulated spark plug wire pliers to momentarily disconnect each plug wire. Another is to make sure no part of your body is touching or leaning against any metal surface on the vehicle (the fender, hood, grille, etc.). Or, you could turn the engine off, remove a plug wire, restart the engine, note any change in idle, then repeat for each of the remaining spark plugs. Ignition Diagnosis If you disconnect the plug wire from the spark plug and hold the end of the wire close to the plug terminal or other metal surface, you should see a spark and/or hear a crisp snapping noise if voltage is getting through the wire. No spark would tell you the plug wire is bad, voltage is arcing inside the distributor cap (remove and inspect the cap for cracks and carbon tracks -- replace if any are found) or a dead coil on a distributorless ignition system (Note: on most distributorless ignition systems, each coil fires two cylinders. So if both cylinders are dead, you know for sure the coil is not working. If only one cylinder is dead, however, it’s not the coil). If all of the plug wires seem to be sparking okay, the next step would be to remove the spark plug in the problem cylinder. Fouling is a common cause of ignition misfire. Examine the end of the plug. If the electrode is covered with deposits, clean or replace the spark plug. Also, note the type of deposits on the plug. Thick, black, wet or oily-looking deposits would tell you the cylinder is burning oil (probably due to worn valve guides, rings and/or cylinder wall). If the deposits are a powdery black, the cylinder is running too rich (probably due to a leaky injector on a multipoint fuel injected engine). If the deposits are brown or gray, it indicates a normal buildup. However, the plug may be fouled because it hasn’t been changed for a long time, because it is the wrong "heat range" for your engine application (you need a hotter plug), or because of frequent short trip stop-and-go driving. In any event, if the plug is fouled you should probably remove, inspect and clean or replace all of the spark plugs. Fuel Diagnosis If the dead cylinder is receiving spark through the plug wire and the spark plug itself appears to be okay (not wet or fouled), and your engine has multipoint fuel injection you may have a dead fuel injector. To check for this kind of problem, start the engine and place your finger on the injector. You should feel a buzzing vibration if the injector is working. No buzz means the injector is either defective or it is not receiving a voltage signal through its wiring harness. You can check for the presence of voltage with a 12 volt test light or voltmeter. Disconnect the injector wiring connector and attach the test light or voltmeter between the injector and connector. If the light doesn’t flash or you don’t see a voltage reading when the engine is running, it indicates a wiring or computer problem that will require further diagnosis. If voltage is getting through but the injector isn’t working, then the injector is defective and needs to be replaced. Sometimes the injector will appear to be working but really isn’t. It will be receiving voltage and buzzing as normal, but because it is clogged up with varnish deposits little or no fuel is actually being squirted into the cylinder. If ignition and compression are both okay in the bad cylinder, therefore, it would tell you the injector is clogged. On-car cleaning may reopen the clogged injector is the varnish isn’t built up too thick. But a completely clogged injector usually doesn’t respond well to this type of cleaning. It either has to be removed for off-car cleaning (which may or may not succeed id reopening it) or be replaced. Compression Diagnosis If the dead cylinder is getting spark and fuel, the only thing that’s left is a compression problem. The most likely causes here would be a leaky valve (probably an exhaust valve since they run much hotter than intake valves and usually fail or "burn" first), a blown head gasket (this usually involves two adjacent cylinders, however), or a rounded or badly worn cam lobe. A compression check will verify if the cylinder is developing its normal compression. Little or no compression would verify any of the above problems. A leakage test could also be used to further diagnose and identify the nature of the problem (valves, head gasket or cam). Air leakage through the exhaust port would indicate a bad exhaust valve. Air leakage back through the intake manifold would indicate a bad intake valve. Air leaking into an adjacent cylinder would indicate a blown head gasket. Minimal leakage would indicate a rounded cam lobe. Leaky valves would require removing the cylinder head and having a valve job performed. A leaky head gasket would require removing the head and replacing the gasket (and probably resurfacing the head to restore flatness). A cam problem would require removing and replacing the camshaft and lifters (old lifters should never be reused with a new cam).


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